Why were beds damp in old castles?

Alison Krajcik asked a question: Why were beds damp in old castles?
Asked By: Alison Krajcik
Date created: Thu, May 6, 2021 9:59 PM

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👉 Why were beds damp in old castles history?

The real development of canopy beds in medieval Europe. Part of our refutation of the infamous Bad Old Days net hoax. The Facts In most castles and manor houses and in some town dwellings, materials such as wood, clay tiles, and stone were used for roofing…

👉 Why were beds damp in old castles images?

The Facts . In most castles and manor houses and in some town dwellings, materials such as wood, clay tiles, and stone were used for roofing. All served even better than thatch to "stop things from falling into the house." Poor peasant folk, who were the most likely to suffer the annoyances brought about by an ill-kept thatch roof, commonly slept on straw pallets on the floor or in a loft. 1 ...

👉 Why were beds damp in old castles near?

The real development of canopy beds in medieval Europe. Part of our refutation of the infamous Bad Old Days net hoax. The Facts In most castles and manor houses and in some town dwellings, materials such as wood, clay tiles, and stone were used for roofing…

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Most castles were built on the top of hills or overlooking natural harbors. Both of these locations tend to suffer from extremes of weather such as high winds and driving rain. The result is that castles are generally cold and damp. Medieval builders didn't understand the benefit of inserting a damp proof course into walls and floors.

If the mattress itself needed cleaning, which it often did, because of lice, fleas and other nasty bedbugs, the maids would have to un-stuff it, have the mattress cleaned and then re-stuff it. ***It should also be noted that Parliament during the 14th century seemed to understand the need for cleanliness and its link to disease.

The Facts . In most castles and manor houses and in some town dwellings, materials such as wood, clay tiles, and stone were used for roofing. All served even better than thatch to "stop things from falling into the house." Poor peasant folk, who were the most likely to suffer the annoyances brought about by an ill-kept thatch roof, commonly slept on straw pallets on the floor or in a loft. 1 ...

Even during the warmest months of the year, the castle retained a cool dampness and all residents spent as much time as possible enjoying the outdoors. Oftentimes, members wrapped blankets around themselves to keep warm while at work (from which we derive the term bedclothes).

Most of the servants and military folk would sleep on pallets or trundles, if they were lucky. These were mats of either woven straw and rushes or mattresses stuffed with straw that were laid on the floor. Nobody was assigned a private sleeping area or spot on the floor. It was every man, woman and child for themselves.

Beds in . Late Medieval and Tudor Times >> glossary of bed and bedding terms In the 14th century the poorest people slept on a straw mattress on the floor with whatever warm covering they could get. The richest houses had large elaborate beds, with ornamented canopies, richly-embroidered hangings, and soft featherbeds under the fine linen sheets.

There’s a REASON many high-class beds of the time were enclosed (reference canopy beds), and for the existence of bed warming pans. The older “motte and bailey” type castles might have actually been able to keep semi-warm, as they were much smaller and NOT made out of stone for the most part.

Beds through the ages. Roman bed frames were quite simple, and were made from wood or iron. Rich Romans liked to cover them with exotic fabrics. The Roman poet Martial tells of one man who pretended to be ill so that people would visit him in bed and admire his covers. Only poor couples slept together Rich people preferred separate bedrooms.

Learning to plump and smooth the bed well was one of the arts of housekeeping. Featherbeds were criticised by a few 19th century writers who felt they were unhealthy: too warm, too soft, too self-indulgent. Florence Nightingale said simply, "Never use a feather bed, either for sick or well".

Crystalline Castles. Crystalline Castle upgrades were added in the 2.4.1. update and are only available on the Natural Islands. These upgrades allow at least one of each monster to be on the island at once, with the maximum bed space at the final upgrade being 180.

The result is that castles are generally cold and damp. Medieval builders didn't understand the benefit of inserting a damp proof course into walls and floors. Many castles are surrounded by moats or natural water courses for defense. So medieval castles suffered with both penetrating damp through the walls and rising damp through the earth floors. Life Inside a Medieval Castle. No Glass in Their Windows and No Flushing Toilets. Castles were dark inside with little natural light. Glass was ...

The Facts . In most castles and manor houses and in some town dwellings, materials such as wood, clay tiles, and stone were used for roofing. All served even better than thatch to "stop things from falling into the house." Poor peasant folk, who were the most likely to suffer the annoyances brought about by an ill-kept thatch roof, commonly slept on straw pallets on the floor or in a loft. 1 They did not have canopy beds to keep out falling dead wasps and rat droppings.

The lord, his family and guests had the added comfort of heavy blankets, feather mattresses, fur covers, and tapestries hanging on the walls to block the damp and breezes, while residents of lesser status usually slept in the towers and made due with lighter bedclothes and the human body for warmth.

Medieval castles were a lot different than castles of today or even castles of the Regency period. There weren’t an abundance of bed chambers. In most cases there was only one bed chamber, and that may even double as the solar, where the noble family could entertain guests, take a bath, do their business and get away from the hustle and bustle of the castle. In the solar, their bed would serve not only as a place for sleep and *wink* play, but as a seat as well.

Red bed-curtains were popular, but many kings and queens preferred green. Medieval beds were made to be portable. When a lord and lady travelled to their various castles and houses, they often took their own beds with them. Visiting guests also sometimes arrived with their own bed, which were set up in any convenient room. While the servants ...

It depended on the castle and who ran it. Some were changed monthly, some seasonally and some once a year. Whatever the case you can only imagine what was found underneath… During the 15th century, the great scholar Erasmus wrote in a letter to a friend the following: “The doors are, in general, laid with white clay, and are covered with rushes, occasionally renewed, but so imperfectly that the bottom layer is left undisturbed, sometimes for twenty years, harbouring expectoration ...

In 1487 a generous benefactor who was leaving money to house old people added a pair of sheets to this list, and estimated that each bed would then cost 13 shillings and sixpence. By this time peasants were sleeping in a little more comfort, and were more likely to be raised off the floor. One mid-15th century inventory of a smallholder's possessions shows that he had "three boards for a bed", a sheet and pillows, as well as some worn coverlets and canvas covers.

Castles were built in England and Wales after 1066. They cemented a new social system of feudalism in place. Each new castle secured the power of the local lord over his vassals. To serve the lord, most castles would have been places of frenzied domestic activity. Life in a medieval castle was filled with a constant hubbub of busied work in the kitchens, preparations for celebrations in the Great Hall, and religious worship in each castle’s own chapel. And the layout of a typical Medieval ...

On the minus side, huge quantities of thermal inertia in those rocks - castles of any military value tended to be pretty cold in the winter except for small areas around the fireplaces, and pretty hot in the summer. There’s a REASON many high-class beds of the time were enclosed (reference canopy beds), and for the existence of bed warming pans.

8. Up until the Middle Ages, the Great Halls were used not only to entertain and eat, but also as sleeping quarters for the household. 9. The first stone castles built were cold, dark, smelly and damp.Inside the castle walls, floor coverings consisted of straw rushes and, later, sweet smelling herbs to mask the smell of animal excrement, grease, rotting food and beer.

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Why were beds made on high platforms in castles for sale?

Beds tended to be quite high and might be raised further by being set on a platform. High beds might have a servant's trundle bed underneath: for a personal valet or maid. Beds and bedding were so valuable and highly prized that they were not passed casually down the generations, and it is not unusual to find them mentioned in wills from the ...

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Why were beds made on high platforms in castles in europe?

The actual bedstead was usually an independent structure within all the finery. Beds tended to be quite high and might be raised further by being set on a platform. High beds might have a servant's trundle bed underneath: for a personal valet or maid.

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Why were beds made on high platforms in castles in germany?

Another important feature of a medieval castle parts list is called a machicolation. Medieval castle machicolations were projecting platforms at the top of castle walls and usually protruded from the walls. At the floor of these platforms there were openings which could be used to drop stones and various other materials on the enemy.

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Why were beds made on high platforms in castles in greece?

The Facts . In most castles and manor houses and in some town dwellings, materials such as wood, clay tiles, and stone were used for roofing. All served even better than thatch to "stop things from falling into the house." Poor peasant folk, who were the most likely to suffer the annoyances brought about by an ill-kept thatch roof, commonly slept on straw pallets on the floor or in a loft. 1 ...

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Why were beds made on high platforms in castles in norway?

Order Castles were the pinnacle of Nazi education, aimed at young adults who aspired to the highest ranks of the Nazi party. To be considered for entry, applicants had to have attended an Adolf Hitler School for six years, undertaken state labour for two and a half years, and spent four years in full-time work.

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Why were beds made on high platforms in castles in sweden?

What Beds Were Like in 1776. Long before steel-coil innersprings and high-tech memory foam—or any mattress at all, for that matter—early humans slept on layers of reeds, rushes, and leaves, where they bedded down along with their extended families. Then came piles of straw, woven mats, and cloth sacks filled with hay.

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Why does germany castles have small beds?

The state bed in the neo-gothic style and the seat coverings are in blue silk, with embroidered and appliquéd lions, swans, crowns, lilies and the Bavarian coat of arms. One of the most unusual features is the washstand, with a fountain in the form of a silver-plated swan.

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Were medieval castles were built?

Medieval castles were built from the 11th century CE for rulers to demonstrate their wealth and power to the local populace, to provide a place of defence and safe retreat in the case of attack, defend strategically important sites like river crossings, passages through hills, mountains and frontiers, and as a place of ...

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Were castles cold?

neuschwanstein castle medieval castle

Castles weren't always cold and dark places to live.

Castles are always depicted as dark and cold and some probably were. But, in reality, the great hall of castle had a large open hearth to provide heat and light (at least until the late 12th century) and later it had wall fireplace.

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Were castles effective?

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Castles were great defences against the enemy. However, when gunpowder was invented the castles stopped being an effective form of defence. By the end of the 1300s gunpowder was widely in use. The medieval castle with its high vertical walls was no longer the invincible fortification it had been.

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Were castles flammable?

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Though stone and brick are relatively fire resistant, castles were filled with flammable materials. Carpets, wall hangings, and floor coverings could easily catch on fire. Especially intense heat could even damage the stone, given enough time and a high temperature.

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Were castles painted?

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Once a stone castle was built, its owner would then have to spend a vast sum on furnishing and decorating it. The interior walls were usually plastered and painted, often with elaborate frescos and bright, expensive colours. Ultimately, the castle was a symbol of its owner's wealth and power.

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Were castles whitewashed?

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Castle walls could be plastered and whitewashed to protect the walls and mortar. The White Tower in the Tower of London is named for such a reason… For example, churches originally had the stone walls covered.

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What were castles?

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What Are the Purpose of Castles? Other Names for Castles. A castle built as a military stronghold may be called a fort, fortress, stronghold, or... The Example of Castle Ashby. Watching a cricket match on the grounds of Castle Ashby, the casual travel might have... Castle Details Handed Down. The ...

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When were castles?

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Historians have interpreted the widespread presence of castles across Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries as evidence that warfare was common, and usually between local lords. Castles were introduced into England shortly before the Norman Conquest in 1066.

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Where were castles?

castles were normally built on cliffs so they can only be attacked from 1 side, on mountains so they can see their enemies approaching and near bodies of water like right in front of a beach so they were only able to be attacked from 1 side

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How were midevil castles were designed?

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The first castles were simply 'mounds' of earth, and medieval castle designs improved on these basics – adding ditches in the Motte & Bailey design. As technology advanced – and as attackers got more sophisticated – elaborate concentric castle designs emerged, creating a fortress almost impregnable to its enemies.

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How big were castles?

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Some later medieval castles had walls that were only about 15 to 20 feet (4.6 m to 6 m) high, but the walls of the stronger castles typically measured about 30 feet (9 m) in height and sometimes more. e wall of Eng- land's Framlingham Castle reached 40 feet (12 m) above the ground.

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How castles were cleaned?

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For instance, a lot of medieval castles had the floors strewn with rushes or straw… Rush or straw woven mats were introduced to some to help with cleaning, so that these could be taken outside and beaten while the floors were swept, however some still preferred the strewn look.

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How castles were constructed?

  • The simple construction of castle started with a wooden structure on the top of a stack completely bordered by a ditch. On flat surfaces, a wide water ditch called as moat was constructed. At a later phase, the moat formed was divided from the real castle by a sequence of elevated walls.

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